Bariatric Surgery

We know that making the decision to have weight loss surgery is a big one, and we take that seriously. Our team believes that the best way to make the right decision is through education and partnership with your surgeon.

The first required step towards weight loss surgery is attending one of our free seminars. St. John Medical Center offers seminars on the following dates:

  • October 16
  • November 20
  • December 18

All classes are 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. at the Mary K. Chapman Health Plaza, LaFortune Room, 1819 E. 19th St., in Tulsa. Preregistration is required. Please click here to register or call the St. John PulseLine at 918-215-2857.

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Surgery for the treatment of obesity is the most effective means of significant, long-term weight loss. Bariatric surgery, often called weight loss surgery, is a treatment option for those considered morbidly obese and who have had little or no success losing weight through other means. Different surgeries produce weight loss at different rates. St. John offers the following surgical procedures, depending on the needs of the patient:

  • Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
  • Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

Click here to compare these options. The following criteria can help determine if you are eligible for bariatric surgery:

  • Based on your height and weight, if your body mass index (BMI) is 40 or above, you may be a candidate for bariatric surgery.
  • If your BMI is 35 or higher and you have other medical conditions complicated by obesity, you may be a candidate for surgery. Click here to calculate your BMI.

Consult with your primary care physician about your options for weight loss. Ask if bariatric surgery is right for you. You may be eligible for weight loss surgery at St. John if:

  • You are over 18 years old.
  • Your health insurance plan covers the procedure.
  • You are willing to participate in a weight loss program if required by your surgeon or insurance company.
  • You are able to demonstrate a clear understanding of what is required after surgery.

Bariatric surgery is not recommended for patients diagnosed with alcoholism, overt psychosis, excessive somatization (complaints about symptoms with no identifiable physical origin) or major cardiopulmonary disease, as these conditions may lead to greater risks during and after surgery.